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PCB Tech

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PCB Tech

PCB Tech

Design of controlled impedance circuit board and characteristic impedance of interconnection line
2021-10-02
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Author:Downs

In recent years, an increasingly important issue in the field of high-speed design is the design of circuit boards with controlled impedance and the characteristic impedance of interconnect lines on the circuit board. However, for non-electronic design engineers, this is also a rather confusing and unintuitive problem. Even many electronic design engineers are equally confused about this.

   Characteristic impedance of transmission line

    From the perspective of the battery, once the design engineer connects the lead of the battery to the front end of the transmission line, there is always a constant value of current flowing out of the battery, and the voltage signal is kept stable. Some people may ask, what kind of electronic components have such behavior? When a constant voltage signal is added, it will maintain a constant current value, which is of course a resistance.

    For the battery, when the signal propagates forward along the transmission line, every 10ps time interval, a new transmission line segment of 0.06 inches will be added to be charged to 1V. The newly increased charge obtained from the battery ensures that a stable battery is maintained. The current draws a constant current from the battery, the transmission line is equivalent to a resistor, and the resistance is constant. We call it the surge impedance of the transmission line.

pcb board

    Similarly, when a signal travels forward along a transmission line, every certain distance it travels, the signal will constantly probe the electrical environment of the signal line and try to determine the impedance of the signal when it travels further forward. Once the signal has been added to the transmission line and propagated along the transmission line, the signal itself has been examining how much current is needed to charge the length of the transmission line propagated in the 10ps time interval, and keep this part of the transmission line segment charged to 1V. This is the instantaneous impedance value we want to analyze.

    From the perspective of the battery itself, if the signal propagates along the direction of the transmission line at a constant speed, and assuming that the transmission line has a uniform cross-section, then each time the signal propagates a fixed length (such as the distance the signal propagates in a 10ps time interval), then it needs Get the same amount of charge from the battery to ensure that this section of the transmission line is charged to the same signal voltage. Each time the signal propagates a fixed distance, the same current will be obtained from the battery and the signal voltage will be kept consistent. During the signal propagation process, the instantaneous impedance everywhere on the transmission line is the same.

    In the process of signal propagation along the transmission line, if there is a consistent signal propagation speed everywhere on the transmission line, and the capacitance per unit length is also the same, then the signal will always see a completely consistent instantaneous impedance during the propagation process. Since the impedance remains constant on the entire transmission line, we give a specific name to represent this characteristic or characteristic of a specific transmission line, which is called the characteristic impedance of the transmission line. The characteristic impedance refers to the instantaneous impedance value seen by the signal when the signal propagates along the transmission line. If the characteristic impedance seen by the signal remains the same at all times while the signal is propagating along the transmission line, then such a transmission line is called a controlled impedance transmission line.

    The characteristic impedance of the transmission line is a very important factor in the design

    The instantaneous impedance or characteristic impedance of the transmission line is a very important factor that affects the signal quality. If the impedance between adjacent signal propagation intervals remains the same during signal propagation, then the signal can propagate forward very smoothly, and the situation becomes very simple.

    In order to ensure better signal quality, the goal of signal interconnection design is to ensure that the impedance seen during signal transmission remains as constant as possible. This mainly refers to keeping the characteristic impedance of the transmission line constant. Therefore, the design and manufacture of PCB boards with controlled impedance becomes more and more important. As for any other design tricks, such as minimizing the finger length, terminal matching, daisy chain connection or branch connection, etc., all are to ensure that the signal can see a consistent instantaneous impedance.

    Calculation of characteristic impedance

    From the above simple model, we can deduce the value of the characteristic impedance, that is, the value of the instantaneous impedance seen during the transmission of the signal. The impedance Z seen by the signal in each propagation interval is consistent with the basic definition of impedance

    Z=V/I

    The voltage V here refers to the signal voltage added to the transmission line, and the current I refers to the total amount of charge δQ obtained from the battery in each time interval δt, so

    I=δQ/δt

    The charge flowing into the transmission line (the charge ultimately comes from the signal source) is used to charge the capacitance δC formed between the newly added signal line and the return path in the signal propagation process to the voltage V, so

    δQ=VδC

    We can relate the capacitance caused by the signal traveling a certain distance during the propagation process with the capacitance value CL per unit length of the transmission line and the speed U of the signal propagating on the transmission line. At the same time, the distance the signal travels is the speed U multiplied by the time interval δt. so

    δC=CLUδt

    Combining all the above equations, we can derive the instantaneous impedance as:

    Z=V/I=V/(δQ/δt)=V/(VδC/δt)=V/(VCLUδt/δt)=1/(CLU)

    It can be seen that the instantaneous impedance is related to the capacitance value per unit transmission line length and the speed of signal transmission. This can also be artificially defined as the characteristic impedance of the transmission line. In order to distinguish the characteristic impedance from the actual impedance Z, a subscript 0 is specially added to the characteristic impedance. The characteristic impedance of the signal transmission line has been obtained from the above derivation:

    Z0 = 1/(CLU)

    If the capacitance value per unit length of the transmission line and the speed at which the signal propagates on the transmission line remain constant, then the transmission line has a constant characteristic impedance within its length. Such a transmission line is called a controlled impedance transmission line

    It can be seen from the above brief description that some intuitive knowledge about capacitance can be connected with the newly discovered intuitive knowledge of characteristic impedance. In other words, if the signal wiring in the PCB is widened, the capacitance value per unit length of the transmission line will increase, and the characteristic impedance of the transmission line can be reduced.

    Intriguing topic

    Some confusing statements about the characteristic impedance of transmission lines can often be heard. According to the above analysis, after connecting the signal source to the transmission line, you should be able to see a certain value of the characteristic impedance of the transmission line, for example, 50Ω. However, if you connect an ohmmeter to the same 3-foot-long RG58 cable, The measured impedance is infinite. The answer to the question is that the impedance value seen from the front end of any transmission line changes with time. If the time for measuring the cable impedance is short enough to be comparable to the time the signal takes to go back and forth in the cable, you can measure the surge impedance of the cable or the characteristic impedance of the cable. However, if you wait for enough time, a part of the energy will be reflected back and detected by the measuring instrument. At this time, the impedance change can be detected. Normally, in this process, the impedance will change back and forth until the impedance value. A stable state is reached: if the end of the cable is open, the final impedance value is infinite, and if the end of the cable is short-circuited, the final impedance value is zero.

    For a 3-foot-long RG58 cable, the impedance measurement process must be completed within a time interval of less than 3ns. This is what the Time Domain Reflectometer (TDR) will do. TDR can measure the dynamic impedance of a transmission line. If it takes a time interval of 1s to measure the impedance of a 3-foot-long RG58 cable, then the signal has been reflected back and forth millions of times during this time interval, then you may get completely different from the huge change in impedance The value of impedance, the final result is infinity, because the terminal of the cable is open.

The above is the description of the controlled impedance PCB design and the characteristic impedance of the interconnection line